Town Hall Meeting on Sexual Assault: Part 2

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Facts About Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII applies to employers with 15 or more employees, including state and local governments. It also applies to employment agencies and to labor organizations, as well as to the federal government.

Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual's employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual's work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.

Sexual harassment can occur in a variety of circumstances, including but not limited to the following:

1.The victim as well as the harasser may be a woman or a man. The victim does not have to be of the opposite sex.

2.The harasser can be the victim's supervisor, an agent of the employer, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or a non-employee.

3.The victim does not have to be the person harassed but could be anyone affected by the offensive conduct.

Unlawful sexual harassment may occur without economic injury to or discharge of the victim.

 

The harasser's conduct must be unwelcome.

It is helpful for the victim to inform the harasser directly that the conduct is unwelcome and must stop. The victim should use any employer complaint mechanism or grievance system available.

When investigating allegations of sexual harassment, EEOC looks at the whole record: the circumstances, such as the nature of the sexual advances, and the context in which the alleged incidents occurred. A determination on the allegations is made from the facts on a case-by-case basis.

Prevention is the best tool to eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace. Employers are encouraged to take steps necessary to prevent sexual harassment from occurring. They should clearly communicate to employees that sexual harassment will not be tolerated. They can do so by providing sexual harassment training to their employees and by establishing an effective complaint or grievance process and taking immediate and appropriate action when an employee complains.

It is also unlawful to retaliate against an individual for opposing employment practices that discriminate based on sex or for filing a discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or litigation under Title VII.

•Among those filing complaints, at least 1/3 say they were demoted, moved to lousy shift, fired, further harassed after the complaint

•People who file a complaint are much more likely to lose their jobs than those who say nothing

More than one-third of the world’s countries do not have any laws prohibiting sexual harassment at work—leaving nearly 235 million working women vulnerable in the workplace.

Source: https://www.worldpolicycenter.org/sites/default/files/
WORLD%20Discrimination%20at%20Work%20Report.pdf

Research has shown that women in male-dominated occupations,especially those in male-dominated work contexts, are sexually harassed more than women in balanced or in female-dominated ones.

Source: Berdahl, JL. (2007). The Sexual Harassment of Uppity Women (p. 427).

Sexual harassment is pervasive across industries, but especially in low-wage service jobs. For example, more than 25% of sexual harassment charges filed with the EEOC in the last decade came from industries with service-sector workers.

Source: https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/women/
news/2017/11/20/443139/not-just-rich-famous/

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Training:

•Examples of what is/is not acceptable
•Empower bystander intervention
•Explain procedure for reporting
•Identify consequences
•Identify internal and external resources
•Informed by climate survey

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The Global Gender Gap Report benchmarks 144 countries regarding their progress on gender parity via four main themes: Economic Participation and Opportunity, Educational Attainment, Health and Survival, and Political Empowerment. There's also data around the dynamics of gender gaps across industry talent pools and occupations.

Unfortunately, data shows that the gender gap is widening, so there desperately needs to be new ways of thinking if the world is to close the gender gap. Progress is regressing and moving backwards. Instead of taking 170 years to close the gap at the current rate of progress, it is estimated that gender parity across the world will take over two centuries, 217 years to be exact.

The proportion of female leaders increasing by an average of just over 2 per cent across 12 industries studied by the World Economic Forum (WEF). WEF's data shows that when women are more present and participating in leadership roles, more women are hired right across the board at all levels.

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Special Thanks to our Panelists and Volunteers for helping make this event a successful one!

And, also Thanks to our Refreshment Donations by: 

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