Inspire! Topic: ACES (Adverse Childhood Experiences)- Part 2

Inspire! Topic: ACES
Saturday, April 20, 2019

Continuing the community discussion, we’ll see the presentation from Jodi Spicer, looking at ACES from the State level for Michigan.

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Across state systems – Michigan’s Children, MCH, Medicaid, CAHC  as well as in communities – Muskegon ACEs Report

Across state systems – Michigan’s Children, MCH, Medicaid, CAHC

as well as in communities – Muskegon ACEs Report

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The Michigan ACE Initiative was created in December 2016, and was focused on expanding efforts toward a statewide awareness of Adverse Childhood Experiences and creating a statewide coalition to recommend development of appropriate interventions and state policy; and to provide for the implementation of Medicaid policy for ACE. 

The MAHP Foundation received $500,000 from the Michigan Health Endowment Fund for two years. The Michigan ACE Initiative has trained 106 people (aimed at those who interact with children on a regular basis, including social workers, teachers, community health workers and parents) to understand behaviors that exemplify ACEs. This awareness will help children receive assistance from familiar faces within the community.

To date, the Michigan ACE Initiative has trained and presented to over 12,000 individuals on ACEs.

We have some of these fliers and informational pieces available at The Momentum Center. We will also be playing the film, Resilience, on Friday, April 26th at 7pm (Dinner will be available (free) at 6pm).  https://www.facebook.com/events/2162510670507952/

We have some of these fliers and informational pieces available at The Momentum Center. We will also be playing the film, Resilience, on Friday, April 26th at 7pm (Dinner will be available (free) at 6pm). https://www.facebook.com/events/2162510670507952/

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ACEs are considered to be the most powerful predictor of health. They are considered to be the most important determinant because they are driving so many different problems and also because they are driving such a large percentage of each of these problems. In epidemiology, there's a standard calculation that's called population-attributable risk, and that calculation allows us to look at -- if we imagine that we were able to erase all ACEs from the population, the population attributable risk calculation tells us how much of a disease or condition would no longer be present in the population.

For this particular graphic, developed by Washington State, thinks about ACEs as an oil spill in the social ecology of our lives and you can see some of the ACE-attributable related problems around the outside of this pie chart and then the dark gray area in the center represents the percentage of each of those that is attributable to adverse childhood experience. So, a third of separation or divorce in the population is attributable to ACEs. 24% of cancer; 1 in 4 cases of cardiovascular disease, 61% of having disturbed, disruptive days where one's mental health kept you from doing usual activities; 67% of life dissatisfaction; almost 56% of anxiety disorders are attributable to adverse childhood experience. These are huge population-attributable risk numbers. Dr. Anda, when he speaks, says he could have spent his entire career as an epidemiologist and senior researcher at the CDC looking for one kind of variable that was driving 2% of any one of these kinds of challenges in the population, but instead he and Dr. Felitti identified the common driving force of very large percentages of many, many different mental, physical, behavioral, social, and productivity problems in the population. These population-attributable risk numbers run from 14% all the way 80% depending on which variable we are looking at, but the good news, from a prevention standpoint, is that as we reduce ACE scores from one generation to the next, it's like putting a sponge in the middle of this oil slick. We are going to reduce all of these ACE attributable problems concurrently.

If you happened to miss out on our Inspire! event last weekend, we were able to record it so you can still be a part of the conversation! Part 1: https://www.facebook.com/MomentumCenter/videos/386840131906529/UzpfSTE2MjY0NjI1NDA5NzA0ODM6MjI5NDA4MjA1MDg3NTE5Mg/
And, Part 2: https://www.facebook.com/MomentumCenter/videos/277533709791460/UzpfSTE2MjY0NjI1NDA5NzA0ODM6MjI5NDA4MjI5NDIwODUwMQ/

As always, we are thankful to our guest Panelists! We’d also like to take a moment to thank the following:

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If you’re able, be sure to make a plan to stop in Friday night to watch the screening of Resilience. Check out some of our upcoming events…